Getting Published in Prehistoric Times, New Art Show

It’s been a busy couple of months with a new job, but there’s some good news. I have been re-invited back to the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center to sell artwork at their arts and crafts fair. The fair is planned for July 11th, and I’ll be working on more artwork.

5 dino paintings

Brachiosaurus WP_003985

I’m also happy to report that this Apatosaurus painting is currently on hold to be printed in the summer 2015 issue of Prehistoric Times magazine, which is almost required reading for those with a passion for paleontology.

Apatosaurus for PT

Now if I can just return to a regular habit of fiction writing…

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New Painting, New Articles

"A Tree to Write Under." Acrylic, painted on 8 x 10 inch canvas.

“A Tree to Write Under.” Acrylic, painted on 8 x 10 inch canvas.

Good evening, everyone. Here’s another one of the paintings I’ve done recently. It was auctioned off by the Pikes Peak Writers Conference last week. I wasn’t able to attend the conference itself due to insufficient finances, but learned a lot from a “pre-conference workshop” the day before. Especially about query letters, and how painfully uninformed I am in writing them.

This is meant to be one of those relaxing scenes you can visit in your mind to forget about the cares of life. Maybe it will put whomever took it home in a good writing mood, like they’re relaxing under that tree with a notebook and a glass of lemonade.

If anyone would like to buy a similar “relaxation” painting, let me know! You can find my email address to the right. I am also doing cards with smaller versions of landscapes like this painted on the front.

I’ve also been branching out with more articles spreading out across the web. An interview about my paintings showed up in the New Falcon Herald.

There’s also a new blog post I contributed to Pikes Peak Writers, about how picking up a creative hobby may help you get past writer’s block. This may not work for every writer, but give it a shot if your muse is getting cold feet.

Catch you later, and God bless!

The Joy of Writing: Robbed and Regained

Like many fantasy writers, I get a ton of inspiration from J.R.R. Tolkien. The more I read his work, the more quotable he becomes. He has left quite an impression on my work and imagination, even in the reasons I write stories.

This will just be a brief instance of that procrastination known as “writing about writing,” before I finally return to the long-neglected bliss of rewriting that fantasy novel and bringing out what I pray will be the story it was meant to tell.

When people began trying to equate his stories of Middle Earth with contemporary events or themes or hot button topics, Tolkien bristled at the notion that he was writing commentary. He was fine with applicability, but current events were not the point. Tolkien had what he described as a cordial dislike for allegory. “I much prefer history, true or feigned, with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers.”

That’s largely my perspective as well. He weaved together this world of Elves and Hobbits and noble Men, and made his stories about the characters and their situations. Not about “the dangers of power” or “relationships” or “self-sacrifice” or the other themes some writers will obsess over. Fiction loses something important when it angsts more about theme/meaning than what its particular characters go through. You can’t quite escape from this world when that happens. Fiction loses its intended illusion of reality.

Perhaps I’m too sensitive, but the fact is my jaw sets, and my enthusiasm and imagination begin to shrivel, when fellow readers and writers spend more time discussing the “themes” or “meaning” of a story than they do discussing the tale itself. I had far too much of that in college, where nearly every professor read ideologies into the text, coldly dissecting it and scrutinizing it like a crowd of microbes in a petri dish.

And then I fell into the creative deathtrap again with too much time on my hands after graduation, taking to the blogosphere and reading deconstructions of movies that only served to rob my enjoyment of the movies themselves. I got fixated on the themes and elements and meanings and cinematography techniques when I wanted to focus on the story. Maybe it’s a side effect of ADD. I don’t know.

Thank God this doesn’t happen to everyone, however! One of my friends told me about how this same practice of dissection and examination can enrich his enjoyment of a story. And more power to him for that!

Being a writer, I still have the responsibility to study the craft of storytelling, and knowing how to tell good tales in satisfying ways. For some reason I enjoy that part of the process.

When I’m learning how to improve my own stories, and when my reading of fiction is done not to scrutinize but to enjoy, I get inspired rather than frustrated. That diminished capacity for joy begins to regain its life and color, and its roots plunge deeper. That frame of mind reminds me how much I love creating new worlds and characters.

Don’t ignore the components of a great story, though. If you are a writer, don’t skimp on technique or think that inspiration is all you need. That’s not what I mean to convey. I only mean to say this: Don’t forget the joy of escaping into another world and making new friends through the pages of a book.

“Salt Flats” is Out! (Plus In-Progress Painting)

Hey, everyone! Sorry I have been gone for a while. But I have good news. The third story in my serialized science fiction tales, “Salt Flats,” is now on Kindle! Today through Wednesday, the first two installments, “Escaping” and “Refugee,” are free, and the new one is just $0.99. It took a while to write this one (it’s slightly longer than the first two combined), but I did love writing it, and mean to keep the series going.

The synopsis:

The battlecraft Aphrodite has crash-landed six miles from the city of Elm’s Corner, the one refuge its survivors can take from an Arriver attack. Isolated from the crew, Sergeant Tobias Carter is left with a choice: run or fight. He and Reverend Rousseau have never met an enemy so fierce. And something about the Aphrodite has attracted the attention of more than just the Arrivers….

If this sounds like your cup of sci-fi tea, three stories for the total price of a buck is a good deal. And whatever you think — good, bad, whatever — feel free to write a quick review on Amazon or Goodreads. Reviews, of course, really help.

On another note, I have gotten more painting done, including my first foray onto a large canvas. It’s just beginning, but here’s what I have so far:

Snow goes on next, then I'm putting a city in the valley.

Snow goes on next, then I’m putting a city in the valley.

I hope you all have an awesome Thanksgiving, and get plenty of time with your loved ones. Catch you all later, and thanks for dropping by!

Characters: Conflict vs. Suffering

Characters are the reason fiction exists. Or so I am told. And this means it is most important to ripen your characters until their stories satisfy the reader. If you focus on plot before character, you’ll get a cool summary of events, but it reads like a news story, and it will be virtually impossible for readers to be immersed and feel like it’s happening to them. If your emphasis goes to worldbuilding, you might get a nice 400 page travelogue (whether or not it’s a world you made up), but again it will be a little cold and aloof — two things fiction are not supposed to be.

Characters are important, is what I’m saying. And one of the basic commandments for a writer is “Make things difficult for them.” Often this has been spoken of in terms of a character “suffering.” It might also be referred to as “conflict.” Interest can only be maintained in a story if something prevents a character from getting what they want.

For the sake of honesty, I’ve lately discovered that I prefer the second term. Maybe that’s just for me individually. I haven’t lived an especially hard life, and like most people I hate the idea of bullying or making anyone suffer. For me, there’s something deeper and more painful than mere discomfort that springs from the idea of maliciously forcing a person to go through a hard time even if it’s for a good end, like writing a satisfactory tale. Just because I want a character to rescue his/her one true love from an assassin and want to make the task overwhelmingly hard doesn’t mean I’m going to do something I hate. If you can do this (to fictional people, mind you) and still tell a great story, then you have my utmost respect and admiration.

However, I can still make the character’s journey difficult and keep myself inspired and glad to be writing at the same time — if I tackle the same problem from the approach of “conflict.” For some reason, that approach gets my own gears turning. Ideas pour out onto the page when I’m not putting some obstacle in the way of a protagonist out of some hidden malice, but because they need a problem to solve that is interesting, urgent, or high-stakes.

Probably a matter of semantics, I know. Nevertheless, even if the character is traumatized and suffers because of the “conflict,” I still need to treat it like a puzzle, and hope to God that I don’t end up with cold, aloof fiction. The approach may be a little more detached, but I take more joy in it, and still realize its final result must hit home for the reader and engage them emotionally.

By the way, yes, I know these characters exist only in my head. It’s still my job to regard them as colleagues and human beings. After all, I’m telling their story, and trying to make readers care about them.

How about you? Do you like approaching characters from a standpoint of suffering or conflict, or something else altogether? I’d love to have some input and get a discussion going. That is, when I’m not frantically trying to finish my own novel’s edits.

Thanks for putting up with another of my dry, abstract ramblings. I do appreciate it!

Report: NaNoWriMo, and 10 Ways to Kill the Fairies of Creative ADD

Mythic Scribes has released yet another awesome article that I recommend to fellow writers. Every one of the items in “10 Easy Steps to Crush Creative ADD” is quite helpful, and I find it especially applicable at this stage of revising the novel. Let me know if you find it helpful, as well.

Also, decided I’m going to do NaNoWriMo this year. The second book in my series, The Wolfglen Legacy: Provoked is overdue for being written, so when revisions on Revived are finished and sent off to an agent, I shall be tackling it. Hopefully I can also establish a stronger continuity in tone and character development by writing the books so close together.

A happy Sunday to all of you!

Quick List of Writing Prompts

For those of you who may need some writing inspiration this morning, here are a couple of suggestions to lend a hand. Hope they are helpful.

1. Out of the lowliest place came my highest moment.

2. Write a couple of different versions of the same scene, dealing with a certain temptation or vice or addiction one of your characters has. Does she give in or not? What, if anything, keeps them from yielding? What are the consequences?

3. “The rain had frozen into a sheet of ice over every tree and branch.” Go from there, and see what happens.