A Bumper Crop of Author Promotions

Putting that Kindle story on hold for a moment, to share something much more important with you, dear reader.

The more I’ve gotten into the writing scene, the more amazing authors I have encountered. They are gifted with stories to stir the emotions — inspiration, humor, terror, tragedy, wonder, love, delight, and a thousand others. Imaginings are their pigments, the mind their canvas, and they work in miracles.

And now it’s time for me to introduce you to some of them. I’ll be glad to introduce more of them later. Most of the ones I’m going to mention here are attending my weekly writing workshop, but I’ll work in a couple of others I’ve had the privilege of meeting.

Please do check them out. We authors need all the help we can get.

First, my good friend and writer of character-driven zombie fiction, Rob Killam. His upcoming Apocalypse Springs novel has survivors who have to slay their own personal demons as well as the ghouls banging down their door. It’s got more heart and brains (heehee) than any other zombie-related work I’ve yet seen. You’d be doing yourself a favor in checking him out.

Next, Jason P. Henry has a funny way with words. A very funny way, and twisted in the best possible sense. Plus he sets up tension like nobody’s business when he decides to get serious.

Ashley Bazer is proof that it’s possible to be a stay-at-home mom and a novelist at the same time. Her science fiction novel Asylum: The Circeae Tales came out just last year, and though I haven’t yet read it, I’m impressed with the quality on display at the writer’s workshop we attend. Did I mention she’s a duchess?

Jackie Hames offers a ton of sound and friendly writing advice, and we’ve had a lot of productive discussions. Plus her defense of speculative fiction is worth some serious thought, and I’m quite enthusiastic to read her upcoming fiction projects.

Genuine rocket scientist and modern renaissance man Grant McKenzie applies extensive knowledge and forethought into each piece he writes. He’s working on historical fiction and a YA fantasy novel, plus he’s one of the few people I know who can create a good rhyming poem in ten minutes or less, and he has a great deal of thought to offer on how the relationships between characters can enrich your work.

A.W. Hartoin is getting quite popular these days, as a writer of mysteries and fairy fantasy who just got her first audiobook! She excels at getting readers invested in a character, and I look forward to reading more of her work.

Last but not least, Angel Smits has published five books, most of which are more of the romantic variety, including a couple of Harlequin Romances. She’s got a knack for good characterization and immersing the reader in a protagonist’s thoughts. Highly recommended.

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Quite aside from that, I have gotten an author’s page on Facebook that I confess I’m pretty happy with. At the risk of sounding self-congratulatory, check it out if you “Like.”

Ooh, and though I have encountered a couple of delays in getting my first Kindle story published, I’m still going to release it, and you’ll all be the first to know. Thanks for your time, everyone!

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Writer’s Workshops: To Critique or Not Critique?

Written text with red ink. It is to some writers what crucifixes are to vampires.

Picture, if you will, two writing workshops. One of them coalesces each Thursday at the local Barnes and Noble, and often draws aspiring writers who need some encouragement to continue in the craft. Many of these less-experienced storytellers have not yet developed a thick skin for unflinching critique, or for rejection letters. As a rule, the workshop outlaws critique of someone’s writing during the time they read it to the group. Some members are more than happy to critique if it’s requested, but you can only give and receive positive comments during the workshop.

The other group is led twice a month at a nearby library, mostly drawing middle schoolers and high schoolers. After a few years of fun, open minded, just-get-it-on-the-page writing exercises, the longstanding group decides to go ahead with allowing critiques of each other’s work (written outside of the workshops, and brought to the group for the express purpose of putting its feet to the fire). The fun, raw creativity of writing exercises still goes on, but now critique sessions will be part of the experience.

I attend both of these workshops, and have led the latter for five years. Both have blessed my life with writer colleagues, and with resources for growing as a storyteller. I plan to keep going to both for as long as possible. The first one may not get many opportunities for its members to be direct with the weaknesses in someone’s writing, but I appreciate its attempts to accommodate new writers who are still shy and may simply need encouragement and a positive environment. The latter will help its attendees, I’m sure, with constructive criticism and iron sharpening iron, and I’m excited that the group is moving in a new direction. Still, the presence of criticism might, just possibly, turn off newcomers who are not yet ready to hear negative things about their writing, no matter how well-intentioned.

There are trade-offs, is what I’m saying. What you’re looking for and what you need as a writer will help you find out if a particular workshop is ideal for you. Some questions I have for writers out there, out of curiosity:

Which writer’s workshop would you rather attend, if you could only pick one?

What do you want from a workshop? What do you need? They’re not necessarily the same thing.

Do you prefer writer’s workshops that have no critiquing, or ones that make time for both critiques and fun exercises? Or do you want a solid critiquing session, where each member runs a gauntlet of highlighted typos, suggestions, and potentially devastating criticism of their words?

When it comes to workshops, how do you think new writers should enter the fray? What kind of group do you think stands to benefit them the most?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this, and get a discussion going. Thanks for your time, everyone! Catch you on Thursday.