Posted by: johnkpatterson | July 24, 2014

More Art, Plans for the Blog, Cameroon Voyage

I’ve been painting a good deal more than I have been writing, to my regret. But the writing is coming back to me, thanks to some writers groups I have been a part of or leading for years.

At least I'm enjoying the artistic results.

At least I’m enjoying the results of painting.

The blog is going to have more musings, sharings, rants, and oddjob add-ons in general. A little bit of everything. Which might sound eccentric, but I’m a painter now and like Bob Ross said, “Us painters are supposed to be a little weird.”

That goes for writers, too. Oh, terrific. Now I’m doubly crazy.

Crazy like a Triceratops. Who writes.

Crazy like a Triceratops. Who writes.

Additionally, I have set a goal to voyage to Cameroon sometime in the near future. Ideally, I will be ready to travel within one year. It would be partially for researching a novel, partially for exploration, and partially for missionary/material aid efforts. Not looking forward to the humidity and heat of Central Africa, but there’s a lot that’s drawing me to that country in particular. I’ll comment more on that in a future post.

Posted by: johnkpatterson | July 12, 2014

Selling Paintings at the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center

This is first post I have written in a very long time, I’ll admit. I have some good news.

Not just good. Ecstatic.

A family member and I went up to the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center in Woodland Park, CO this weekend. I took along a couple of paintings to show them, just in case they would consider carrying a few paintings in the gift shop.

Mated pair of Apatosaurus. Acrylic on wooden plaque, 3 x 5 inches.

Mated pair of Apatosaurus. Acrylic on wooden plaque, 3 x 5 inches. Sold to someone in Woodland Park.

Another wooden plaque with acrylics.

Another wooden plaque with acrylics.

As it turned out, they ended up liking the art so much (particularly the one showing the dinosaur silhouette), that they invited me to be a vendor to sell artwork at an event in early August, and at an arts and crafts festival in July 2015. And as a bonus, someone ended up buying the dinosaur painting mere minutes later!

I’ve pretty much been walking on air ever since. It’s a little daunting, since I have a lot of paintings to do before the first event. But this is the kick in the pants I needed to get this whole painting gig turned into a small business. I am so thankful that events were arranged in just the right way for this to happen, even ones that seemed like hindrances and delays.

There will be more art and writing coming to this blog soon. And I’ve got more stories to work on, as well. Have a great day, everyone!

-John

Posted by: johnkpatterson | June 10, 2014

History for the Fantasy and Sci-Fi writer

johnkpatterson:

Minimum Wage Historian gives a most excellent breakdown of the ways history can lend realism to your fantasy writing. This is an article I think most authors can strongly benefit from reading.

Originally posted on :

Zach – Welcome to Minimum Wage Historian. I’m doing this from Japan so I’m alone today.  Today’s topic is from a presentation I gave at ‘Life The Universe and Everything,’ a writer’s conference held in Provo Utah. This is from last February where I tried to dispell myths about medieval combat and warfare in general and tried to show how the realities of such warfare are actually very fascinating and could add depth, realism and drama to a fantasy story. Yes, fantasy, by definition can really do anything it pleases, but there still has to be logic behind what they do and this is why I’m here, to bring logic to fantasy (and sci-fi) combat. Too many times I’ve read a fantasy book where the two armies clash in mass blobs, everything gets into a confused mess and somehow the hero and villain end up facing each other.

Yeah, you know you've seen this a dozen times. King Aurther, Willow, Dark Knight Rises, and so on. Yeah, you…

View original 4,494 more words

Posted by: johnkpatterson | June 2, 2014

Mist and Moonlight

Here’s the latest of my acrylic paintings, a commission called “Mist and Moonlight.” As always, it’s an acrylic work, and I painted it on an 8 x 10 inch canvas. Thank you very much for stopping by and having a look. I should be returning here soon with some more writing, as well.

Hope you are all having a good day!

Copyright 2014, John K. Patterson

Copyright 2014, John K. Patterson

Posted by: johnkpatterson | May 29, 2014

Fiction: Finals Week

[A quick bit of fiction I wrote in a workshop a few weeks back.]

————————–

For the normal astrophysics grad student, finals week is a special breed of hell, purgatory, medieval torture, and bad karma pressed into a few dozen sheets of paper. The multiple choice questions give new meaning to the phrase “pick your poison.” The essay questions give a sensation of one’s brain being dropped into a rusty food processor.

And then there’s me.

Forget the old cliche of sleeping through the wake up call. My alarm clock woke me up when it was supposed to. It’s me that’s the problem.

I wonder why my shaving cream smells like hazelnut, until it dawns on me that my coffee had a distinct odor of Barbasol. I drank it anyway, being too preoccupied with the umpteenth special relativity equation, after which I could only spare half an hour to review my notes on the properties of super-heated plasma jets accelerated by black holes. The fact that I stirred the cocktail of coffee and the wrong kind of cream with a mechanical pencil is a mere footnote in my mental process. But not the kind of footnote I need to memorize for The Exam.

My roommate, before prancing off to his art appreciation final (where, as I understand it, finger painting can be done for extra credit), tells me, “No pressure, dude.”

I’ve never wished so dearly that I could show him what “no pressure” looks like. In the vacuum of space.

No, no, I berate myself as he skulks out the door. Space isn’t a total vacuum! There are still a few particles drifting around out there. Wayward, serving no particular function, just like me if I don’t pass The Exam.

15 minutes later…

Terrific. Notes are piled into my satchel, I’m leaving with three minutes to spare. And now of course is the day my car gives me the silent treatment, until it’s placated with a new battery.

Okay. Okay. Fine. I’ll walk. Or awkwardly jog/hurry with a satchel slapping me in the flank. Whichever works.

I arrive at the imposing silhouette of the university building, and the exam’s beginning in less than five minutes.

Brilliant. How can this day get any –

NO! No. I didn’t finish it. You can’t be jinxed if you didn’t complete it, right?

It’s raining.

Deep breaths. Go to your happy place.

That’s okay. I forgot my shower anyway. Or maybe I did and just forgot to rinse. Why do I smell shampoo?

My eyes are stinging. Yep, definitely forgot to rinse.

Posted by: johnkpatterson | May 17, 2014

Artwork: Cabins and Trees

These are two new paintings, done for a good friend who’s moving away and wanted a reminder of Colorado. Both are, as always, done with acrylic paint. I hope you enjoy them.

Watercolor paper. Roughly 4 x 6 inches.

Watercolor paper. Roughly 4 x 6 inches.

Done on miniature canvas. 2.75 inches square.

Done on miniature canvas. 2.75 inches square.

[Copyright, of course, belongs to me.]

 

Posted by: johnkpatterson | May 10, 2014

“Moss-Covered Mansion” – A Mother’s Day Card

I’ve started painting my own cards. This will come in handy around birthdays and Christmas. I’m also going to try selling them, very soon. I’ll keep you posted on that.

“Moss-Covered Mansion” is a Mother’s Day card I did for my grandmother. (My mom will get one too, of course!) Painted in acrylics, which were diluted to look like watercolors. It’s about 4 x 6 inches. Thanks for looking!

Now with flowers

Posted by: johnkpatterson | May 10, 2014

A Note on Science and Skepticism

“Question everything.” If only Neil deGrasse Tyson would turn this elegant phrase on his own positions, especially regarding known historical fact.

I had the great honor of meeting Tyson at the 2006 Space Symposium in Colorado Springs. He was incredibly witty, friendly, and accessible. We had a grand time discussing the possibility of life on Jupiter’s frozen moon Europa, while waiting in line for ice cream. For this reason and others, Cosmos was a series I looked forward to. So far I’ve watched the pilot, and more than half of another episode (there’s a lot of TV I have yet to catch up on; procrastinators unite…tomorrow). The visuals are incredible — they are the kinds of things I’ve longed for since Jurassic Park forever spoiled me to special effects. If only Tyson’s “polite” antagonism toward theism didn’t keep throwing itself in the way. Oh well. One day I’d love to meet up with him again over coffee and discuss science once more.

However, I bring up this matter to illuminate a larger point, about skepticism. What passes for “skepticism” today ain’t what it used to be. What it should be.

Anyone can make a claim about reality. But whether it meshes with what is already known is another matter entirely. Like Tyson’s inaccurate portrayal of Giordano Bruno tarnishing an otherwise amazing introduction to the wonders of the universe, a faulty line of reasoning or a powerful and trendy agenda can throw a wrench into the gears of critical thinking.

Science is by its nature investigative. It is a fine scientist indeed who manages to put aside as much of his bias as possible, and draw conclusions based on what is observed rather than what he thinks “should” be there. It’s an ideal we may never fully realize, but knowledge is only gained when you keep reaching for it.

In other words, science as properly practiced has no sympathy for dogma or declarative statements that something is “impossible.” Nature itself seems to lack that sympathy, as well. Seashells have inspired possible modifications of military armor. Jupiter’s moons were thought to be boring, cold chunks of ice before the Voyager probes revealed otherwise. Soft tissue has been confirmed in dinosaur fossils, which surprised just about everyone. The universe keeps knocking our expectations off their fragile pedestals over and over again. I thought we would have learned our lesson by now.

Alas, the modern skeptic, rather than pay any attention to his creed and examine matters at hand with a careful eye, tends to arrogantly scoff at certain verboten claims even before he examines them. Clumsy ad hominem attacks and self-assured political grandstanding start to take the place of any actual care for accuracy. Oftentimes they can make a legitimate point (as in the case of vaccine safety), but follow a faulty line of reasoning. Being right for the wrong reasons is almost as bad as being flat-out wrong.

For that reason, I tend to distrust the conclusions of a self-described “skeptic.” If you call yourself a skeptic, I only ask you to please walk the talk. Send the hard questions in every direction, not only at your favorite punching bag. Remember to sharpen your own thinking skills, and remember: even those with a university degree and grant money can engage in pseudoscience.

Posted by: johnkpatterson | April 30, 2014

New Painting, New Articles

"A Tree to Write Under." Acrylic, painted on 8 x 10 inch canvas.

“A Tree to Write Under.” Acrylic, painted on 8 x 10 inch canvas.

Good evening, everyone. Here’s another one of the paintings I’ve done recently. It was auctioned off by the Pikes Peak Writers Conference last week. I wasn’t able to attend the conference itself due to insufficient finances, but learned a lot from a “pre-conference workshop” the day before. Especially about query letters, and how painfully uninformed I am in writing them.

This is meant to be one of those relaxing scenes you can visit in your mind to forget about the cares of life. Maybe it will put whomever took it home in a good writing mood, like they’re relaxing under that tree with a notebook and a glass of lemonade.

If anyone would like to buy a similar “relaxation” painting, let me know! You can find my email address to the right. I am also doing cards with smaller versions of landscapes like this painted on the front.

I’ve also been branching out with more articles spreading out across the web. An interview about my paintings showed up in the New Falcon Herald.

There’s also a new blog post I contributed to Pikes Peak Writers, about how picking up a creative hobby may help you get past writer’s block. This may not work for every writer, but give it a shot if your muse is getting cold feet.

Catch you later, and God bless!

Posted by: johnkpatterson | April 13, 2014

Writing Process Blog Tour

Yesterday, author Robert Mullin kindly tagged me in a blog tour going by the name of The Writing Process. I got to know him over Facebook, and he has become a close friend of mine. A writer and adventurer, he is the author of Bid the Gods Arise, an excellent novel that deftly blends science fiction and fantasy. I haven’t finished it yet, but I’m very enthusiastic to read more of his work.

So, here are the tour’s questions:

What am I working on?

My writing projects are currently twofold.

One, of course, is The Wolfglen Legacy, the epic fantasy series I’ve been working on for the better part of a decade. I’ve pitched it, edited it, had friends read parts of it…but then I realized it hadn’t matured quite enough. I need to finally write books 2, 3, and 4 (pieces of each do exist already), so I’ll see if I can finish the first book by summer this year.

My second project is the serialized science fiction thriller Arrivers. The first three installments are on Amazon Kindle for a buck each, and a fourth entry is underway. I’d love to see where this story goes and get a chance to spend more time with Sergeant Tobias, Reverend Rousseau, and the strange woman who calls herself Jezebel.

How does my work differ from others in its genre?

Apart from games like World of Warcraft and Dungeons and Dragons, I don’t know of any epic fantasy that includes dinosaurs. Or elves who wield flintlock pistols, and treat them with the same deep honor and reverence as Samurai treat the katana. Or a villain who appoints himself as rescuer of mankind, who feels going to war is a necessary step to rescuing us from our own flaws and mistakes.

More than that, however, many new fantasy novels wade in moral ambiguity, Game of Thrones style. It makes for frustrating tales that don’t really celebrate or condemn anything. I want to tell stories that have moral complexity. There’s still a difference between right and wrong, even if they can tie knots around each other.

When it came to the Arrivers stories, I grew weary from seeing one science fiction story after another that was overtly materialistic. You know, the stories told by the likes of Ben Bova and Isaac Asimov, that go out of their way to say religious people are morons, science eradicates miracles, and God no longer has a place in the cosmos. So I wanted to write a science fiction story that wasn’t “religious,” but still admitted there’s more to the universe than particles and natural laws.

Why do I write what I do?

If someone tells me I take my writing too seriously, I’ll take it as a complement. :) My goal is to make someone feel like they are peeking through an interdimensional portal, witnessing events in a universe just as real as ours. Neither characters, nor story, nor world will be ready until it seems they’re entirely real. It’s not quite enough for me to try telling “a good story.” That’s the house’s foundation, so to speak.

How does my writing process work?

A few things help the writing process. Coffee with hazelnut creamer, concept art from movies, reading other novels, peace and quiet, and successfully resisting the siren call of Facebook. Still working on that last one….

I’ll often start with an idea and a paragraph or two, and build it up from there. Normally half of my edits happen as I’m writing the “first draft”. Supposedly this is a big no-no for writers, but it’s ended up helping me more and more with my own work.

Tagging Other Authors

For passing along this blog tour, I’d like to tag “Zombie Rob” Killam, another close friend of mine with an incredible talent for humor and witty dialogue. His upcoming zombie novel is called Apocalypse Springs.

The second writer I wanted to tag is my friend Joe Dorris, starring on the show Prospectors on the Weather Channel and fellow novelist who just released Salmon River Kid. He even paints his own cover art! How cool is that?

And here’s a third: mother, duchess and epic sci-fi author Ashley Hodges Bazer. I’m grinning at the prospect of reading her tales that encompass many worlds and have the kind of big-scale stories that deserve a movie or TV series. Here’s to much success, Ashley!

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 98 other followers

%d bloggers like this: